A shortage of trained personnel with expertise in big data solutions is still one of the main barriers to success for many companies at the current time, a new study has found.

It was stated in a new report from talent management and recruitment specialist Hudson that by 2015 there will be 4.4 million jobs created around the world to support the big data analytics revolution. However, it predicted only a third of these will be filled.

Hudson's research – which was conducted in Australia – also found 78 percent of companies in the country lack the skills and competencies necessary to undertake a big data initiative.

Mark Steyn, chief executive of Hudson Asia Pacific, observed that few organizations are taking an effective approach to tackling the challenges posed by managing, analyzing and exploiting growing volumes of information.

The most important role that companies must fill if they are to be successful with their initiatives is the big data analyst, Hudson stated. However, it added this is also one of the hardest-to-find talents.

"People who can blend deep technical expertise, business and analytical skills, an understanding of the market and the customer represent nirvana in terms of big data talent," Mr Steyn said.

The report also highlighted several key functions that are required for an effective big data management strategy – some of which will require the right technical solutions and some of which will depend on the expertise of the personnel.

These include strong program leadership from the top down, with senior individuals offering the vision to drive change, control projects and ensure value.

Data management tools are also essential, with businesses requiring capabilities for operational extract, transform and load functionality, operational reporting and the ability to develop predictive models.

“Each organization is at a different stage of leveraging big data and it is essential to find the right talent to unlock value from the data tsunami and turn it into actionable insights which deliver business value," Mr Steyn added.