The last few years have seen a huge transformation in the way many businesses deal with their data and much of this is down to emerging open-source solutions that allow companies to do more than they ever dreamed of with their information.

It was noted by GigaOM that technologies such as NoSQL databases have brought many new capabilities to firm's data warehousing and business intelligence solutions, enabling them to not only gather and store more data that in the past, but also to access and analyze it at much higher speeds.

One solution that is central to this revolution in how organizations think about their digital assets is Hadoop. The publication observed this is really shaking up the database landscape as it offers huge potential for streamlining and consolidating a wide variety of operations.

"While the NoSQL movement is a collection of largely disparate, open-source technologies that might or might not directly challenge big-tickets database products, Hadoop is a movement unto itself. And it wants to engulf every piece of data in its path," GigaOM stated.

It was noted that due to a huge effort by developers to improve the capabilities of the tool, Hadoop is no longer just a platform for running batch MapReduce jobs. It is quickly adding a new range of capabilities, including interactive queries and enterprise search and stream processing solutions.

This, along with add-ons such as graph databases and HBase that are built on top of Hadoop, is just the beginning, GigaOM stated.

It predicted earlier this year that the future of the platform is likely to revolve around real-time analytics solutions. Currently, solutions such as batch processing are not fast enough to meet the needs of organizations that demand instant results, for purposes such as serving real-time advertisements or monitoring and reacting to sensor data. But with solutions such as stream processing, many of these limitations are being overcome.

Creator of Hadoop Doug Cutting told GigaOM: "I think there’s still some doubt in people's minds about whether Hadoop is a flash in the pan … and I think they're missing the point." He added: "I think that’s going to be proven to people in the next year."